Tag Archives: Christian Slater

Heathers (1988) 3.28/5 (8)

 

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Rating: The Good – 77.7
Genre: Comedy
Duration: 103 mins
Director: Michael Lehmann
Stars: Winona Ryder, Christian Slater, Shannen Doherty

“Dear diary, my teenage angst bullshit has a bodycount.” Recent addition to the school’s most popular clique, Winona Ryder, is growing ever wearier at the inane conventions of her new friends, three preppy girls all named Heather. In steps Christian Slater, a proactive cynic whose extreme reactions to the superiority complexes of the chosen few are the source of the some shockingly funny moments.

Like all great black comedy and unlike so many recently failed attempts, the darkness in Heathers is effortless and so the comedy is viciously hilarious. Daniel Waters’ delicious script is driven by a playful yet unyielding focus that slices fantastically at the indulgence of the high-school movie genre and indeed society’s broader indulgence of the precious order that its middle class teenagers had so mercilessly forged in the 1980’s in particular.

Ryder has never been better and for those who’ve only seen her Dracula-type performances, they should take a look at this. For such an acerbic story, she brings a level of reality and even warmth to the role that serves to make her incredulous narrations and interactions with the various characters all the funnier. Slater is at his best too, his slow burning charisma making him the perfect choice to play the self-anointed social equaliser. His character becomes both Waters’ main vessel and his target as he slowly works his way through the equally self-anointed social elite. Michael Lehmann’s directing is adequate but a little uninspired, which is actually quite a shame because this movie would otherwise be damn near perfect.

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True Romance (1993) 3.97/5 (5)

 

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Rating: The Good – 78
Genre: Crime, Action
Duration: 120 mins
Director: Tony Scott
Stars: Christian Slater, Patricia Arquette, Brad Pitt

Tony Scott’s finest hour came when he purchased a young video store clerk’s script and executed it with much of the panache and dry wit that the same clerk would soon become renowned for. It tells the story of a geek-come-wild boy Christian Slater who falls in love with prostitute Patricia Arquette, kills her slightly deranged pimp, accidentally steals his cocaine, and then attempts to sell it to some rich Hollywood producer before the coke’s real owner, mob boss Christopher Walken, tracks him down with prejudice.

True Romance quickly became a cult classic because it cut across genres with the same audacity as Reservoir Dogs did. Colourful characters posing hip monologues, an unlikely romance at the center that flavours the entire movie with an essential unreal vibe, and more fists and guns action than you can shake a stick at ensures that the entire caper is bags of unpredictable fun and looks a treat too. With the verve that Scott’s movies were always reaching for coming pre-loaded with Quentin Tarantino’s white hot script, the former commercial director softens his touch and lets the dialogue do the talking. Free from intrusive editing and over the top score, his consistently outstanding scene composition is finally given the room to breathe and the time to be appreciated. Smokey slats of light grace everything with a cosy noir-esque ambiance, perfectly backdropping the lyricism of Tarantino’s words and the enthusiastic performances that bring them to life.

In that last regard, Slater has never been better and he shares a magnetic chemistry with the even better Arquette. Walken is Walken (in the best way possible), Hopper is in fine form as Slater’s estranged father, Oldman is forgivably over the top as the crazed pimp with an epic inferiority complex, and Brad Pitt is a riot as Slater’s L.A. stoner buddy. However, in one of the smaller parts, it’s James Gandolfini who nearly steals the show as the very real (in a wonderful contrast to practically everything else) and very scary enforcer. The last word should go to Hans Zimmer though who, on his own, seems to give this movie a tenderness that raises it above your standard actioner. Okay, not quite in his own, Scott, Tarantino, and Gandolfini helped, a lot.

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The Contender (2000) 3.43/5 (1)

 

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Rating: The Good – 75.9
Genre: Drama
Duration: 126 mins
Director: Rod Lurie
Stars: Joan Allen, Gary Oldman, Jeff Bridges

Writer/director Rod Lurie’s The Contender is a well above average political drama full of intrigue and political machinations. Joan Allen heads a stellar cast as Senator Hanson, a right leaning democrat who has been nominated to fill the vacant office of Vice-president by President Jackson Evans (played with suitable gravitas by Jeff Bridges). Gary Oldman is the hard-line Republican determined to prevent a woman from entering such a high office and filling out the rest of the cast are heavy weights such as Christian Slater, William Peterson, and the great Sam Elliot. Writer-director Rod Lurie handles the drama extremely well knowing when to dial up the tension or when to diffuse it with some well acted humour. His intelligent script pulses with a rich vein of sardonic humour and he keeps each of the actors fully in sync with it throughout. Yes, the characterisations are a little cliched, there is a questionable plot development towards the end, and it’s unapologetically partisan, but one cannot shake the feeling that it all stems from that quirky black comedy at the film’s centre. In the final analysis, though, it’s the performances that make The Contender so rewarding. Bridges makes for a fantastic executive leader and exudes an effortless authority whether he’s finessing or steamrolling those around him. Elliot is electric as his attack dog Chief of Staff and Oldman is as detestable as they come. However, it remains Allen’s film and in these times when most leading female roles usually require the actress to be kicking ten bells out of nasty bad guys for 90 minutes, it’s genuinely satisfying to see one of the most outstanding actresses of her time given material appropriate to her talent.

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